MandysNotes

Absolute Value

20 March 2010 By In Basics & Number Properties
Rate this item
(0 votes)

 

Absolute value is the distance on the real number line between any given number and zero.

 

Absolute value can never be negative, because technically distance can NEVER be negative.

 

Distance is always positive.

 

Absolute value is denoted between | number | - so to the reader, it will appear as: |-3| = 3.

For example:

|-15| = 15,

|20| = 20,

|1 - 9| = | -8 | = 8,

| 0 | = 0.

Example problem:

What is |3 - 4|?

Answer:

|3 -4| = | -1| = 1.

Example problem:

What is |3| + | -4|?

Answer:

|3| + | -4| = 3 + 4 = 7.

Example problem:

What is |3| - |4|?

Answer:

|3| - |4| = 3 - 4 = -1.

Example problem:

what is |( |3| - |4| )|?

Answer: 1.

Note that for any two real numbers, a and b:

|a| + |b| {tex} \geq \ {/tex} |a + b|.

This is called the Triangle Inequality for absolute values.

Read 2664 times Last modified on Thursday, 13 February 2014 17:30

Strict Standards: Only variables should be assigned by reference in /home/mandysno/public_html/templates/ja_university/html/com_k2/ja_university_blog/item.php on line 665
Login to post comments

NOTRad